Woman in grimacing holding painful back 08 Sep 2015

BY: Sunny Jaspal

Acupuncture / Blog / Conditions / Massge / Uncategorised

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Easing Pain Caused By Poor Desk Posture

Woman in grimacing holding painful back

One of the most common complaints people seek treatment for is back pain, shoulder pain and neck pain. In fact more sick days are taken due to pain than any other ailment. Why do so many of us suffer with these conditions and what can we do to manage and prevent them?

Many of the people I treat are office workers, often sitting for long hours and working at computers. Poor posture, poor office ergonomics and working without breaks is a recipe for pain. This type of injury is often classed as a repetitive strain injury (or RSI) and may also include the hand, wrist, forearm and elbow. These problems may arise in any situation (not just at a desk) where bad posture is sustained.

Back, shoulder or neck pain can also be caused by depression, anxiety and stress. Sometimes there is no clear cause of pain. However, it still remains a very real problem that needs treatment.

Tips for Easing Pain

Standing woman demonstrating good posture and bad posture

 

  • Maintain correct sitting posture when working at your computer.
  • Ensure the top of your screen is at eye level so you head is in a neutral position. If you work at a laptop then consider using a laptop riser.
  • Elbows should have a 90-degree bend so that the tops of your arms are relaxed by your side, with your keyboard and mouse within easy and comfortable reach. Laptop users consider using an external keyboard.
  • Feet should be flat on the floor (use a footrest if they do not reach) and knees and hips should have a 90-degree bend.
  • Sit upright in a relaxed posture, using cushions to support your lower back if needed.
  • Take regular breaks – use this as an excuse to keep yourself hydrated.
  • Manage stress, depression and anxiety with self-care. Talk to your GP if you need help and consider other treatment methods such as acupuncture and counselling.

How can acupuncture help?

Acupuncture is great for easing pain. It is recommended by NICE for chronic pain, one of only four treatments recommended! Acupuncture is a safe and effective treatment, which uses slim, sterile and painless needles to gently encourage the body’s ability to heal itself. Acupuncture treatments include massage, cupping and heat therapy such as moxibustion or heat lamps if appropriate. Each treatment lasts an hour, and a course of 6 treatments is recommended. 

Want to find out more?


						

BY: Sunny Jaspal

Aromatherapy / Massge / Reflexology

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Benefits of Aromatherapy
Aromatherapy oils enhance massage treatment

Aromatherapy essential oil bottles

The use of aromatherapy oils at a first glance is perceived as a luxury. However, many would agree that aromatherapy adds a beneficial layer to treatments.

The use of plants for medicine is an ancient tradition. Aromatherapy employs techniques such inhalation and massage. Both of these routes of administration are safe if used in the correct quantities.

Inhalation affects the limbic system, the part of central nervous system which deals with memory and emotion.

Massage treatment allows the oils to be absorbed into the blood stream, and the massage itself affects the nervous system. Relaxation or stimulation of the nervous system depends upon which aromatherapy oils and massage techniques are used.

The goal of the aromatherapist is to assess each client and create a bespoke blend. By looking at the properties of essential oils we can create blends for specific conditions for each individual.

Research into the field of aromatherapy is somewhat scarce, however studies do exist. For example, a systematic review of Lavender oil for poor sleep suggested lavender was of benefit[1]. A more recent study showed a positive link between Lavender and stress reduction[2]. With regards to massage and aromatherapy used together, a study found improvements in knee pain when a blend of orange and ginger were used[3].

www.sunnyjaspal.com

For further reading try:
Encyclopedia of Essential Oils – Julia Lawless
The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy – Salvatore Battaglia


[1] Fismer, K. L., & Pilkington, K. (2012). Lavender and sleep: A systematic review of the evidence. European Journal of Integrative Medicine4(4), e436-e447.

[2] Kim, S., Kim, H. J., Yeo, J. S., Hong, S. J., Lee, J. M., & Jeon, Y. (2011). The effect of lavender oil on stress, bispectral index values, and needle insertion pain in volunteers. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine,17(9), 823-826.

[3] Yip, Y. B., & Tam, A. C. Y. (2008). An experimental study on the effectiveness of massage with aromatic ginger and orange essential oil for moderate-to-severe knee pain among the elderly in Hong Kong. Complementary therapies in medicine16(3), 131-138.

Want to find out more? Contact Sunny. Clinics in St Neots and Letchworth.