BY: Sunny Jaspal

Acupuncture / Blog / Conditions / Uncategorized

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Tips for dealing with PMT
Woman lying on bed with hands over her face.According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory, premenstrual tension (PMT) also known as premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in the time leading up to your menstrual cycle may be caused by stagnation of Qi. Here are some tips to move your Qi and prevent mood swings, irritability, breast distension and bloating:
  • Exercise: anything you enjoy – yoga, Pilates, qi gong, swimming, running – to move your Qi and clear stagnation.
  • A balanced diet: avoid caffeine, alcohol and sugary foods which may cause peaks and troughs, exacerbating mood swings and irritability. Limit salt intake to prevent bloating. Eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables and ‘pungent’ foods such as basil, coriander and peppermint. Ensure portion sizes are not too big and chew your food thoroughly!
  • Complementary therapies such as massage, reflexology or acupuncture: If you feel like the tips above are not working you may need a helping hand. Massage works in a similar way to exercise, moving Qi when it may be stuck. Tell your practitioner if you have any pain. Abdominal massage may be particularly beneficial at this time. Reflexology and acupuncture work on the meridians of the body to move Qi.
  • Remember that PMT is not always caused by Qi stagnation. If you feel like the above tips are not helpful or make you feel worse, seek the advice of a TCM practitioner.
Want to find out more? Contact Sunny. Clinics in St Neots and Letchworth.

BY: Sunny Jaspal

Aromatherapy / Massge / Reflexology

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Benefits of Aromatherapy
Aromatherapy oils enhance massage treatment

Aromatherapy essential oil bottles

The use of aromatherapy oils at a first glance is perceived as a luxury. However, many would agree that aromatherapy adds a beneficial layer to treatments.

The use of plants for medicine is an ancient tradition. Aromatherapy employs techniques such inhalation and massage. Both of these routes of administration are safe if used in the correct quantities.

Inhalation affects the limbic system, the part of central nervous system which deals with memory and emotion.

Massage treatment allows the oils to be absorbed into the blood stream, and the massage itself affects the nervous system. Relaxation or stimulation of the nervous system depends upon which aromatherapy oils and massage techniques are used.

The goal of the aromatherapist is to assess each client and create a bespoke blend. By looking at the properties of essential oils we can create blends for specific conditions for each individual.

Research into the field of aromatherapy is somewhat scarce, however studies do exist. For example, a systematic review of Lavender oil for poor sleep suggested lavender was of benefit[1]. A more recent study showed a positive link between Lavender and stress reduction[2]. With regards to massage and aromatherapy used together, a study found improvements in knee pain when a blend of orange and ginger were used[3].

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For further reading try:
Encyclopedia of Essential Oils – Julia Lawless
The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy – Salvatore Battaglia


[1] Fismer, K. L., & Pilkington, K. (2012). Lavender and sleep: A systematic review of the evidence. European Journal of Integrative Medicine4(4), e436-e447.

[2] Kim, S., Kim, H. J., Yeo, J. S., Hong, S. J., Lee, J. M., & Jeon, Y. (2011). The effect of lavender oil on stress, bispectral index values, and needle insertion pain in volunteers. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine,17(9), 823-826.

[3] Yip, Y. B., & Tam, A. C. Y. (2008). An experimental study on the effectiveness of massage with aromatic ginger and orange essential oil for moderate-to-severe knee pain among the elderly in Hong Kong. Complementary therapies in medicine16(3), 131-138.

Want to find out more? Contact Sunny. Clinics in St Neots and Letchworth.